Friday, February 8, 2008

Trouble in Cincinnati

There seems to be some discontent brewing over at the Cincinnati Rollergirls. It seems that all skaters (new and old) were required to pass the WFTDA minimum skills assessment and a written rules test. Those that did not were told that they could no longer skate with the league, even at practices, but that they would have an opportunity to retake the test mid-season. Wow. I gotta say that's pretty harsh. I'm all for everybody having to pass a minimum skills requirement, but how are people supposed to improve if you don't let them practice with the league? I don't get that. It just seems like a good way to piss off a bunch of people. Read about it here.

I think every league has issues like this (we certainly do) where policies are supported by some girls and not by others and because it is roller derby (roller derby = life) it can get very contentious very quickly. I know WFTDA likes to let all the leagues come up with their own policies, but I wonder if some sort of standardization in (at least some of) these policies might help resolve these issues. What do you think?

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

The greater Cincinnati area has at least half a dozen rinks and two non-WFTDA leagues. Moreover, within a few hour's drive there are leagues in Dayton, Columbus, Lexington, Louisville, and a few others.

There are ample resources for skaters to improve.

The focus for the Cincinnati league is to become competitive nationally and to be recognized as one of the best WFTDA leagues out there. There's a negative effect of that, which implies that the league has chosen to retain and bring in skaters of the highest quality and most dedication, on and off the track.

There are no legacy positions, simply put.

It's not trouble at all; all WFTDA leagues are required to reassess their skaters' skills and knowledge annually. The league did that.

It's unfortunate, and some people are upset. However, where they go from here is their choice to make, and it would be wrong to give up altogether after putting so much effort and heart (and money).

When people apply themselves to getting in shape, developing confidence and determination such that the word "quit" is stricken from their vocabulary, build their skills sufficiently, and apply their knowledge of the rules of derby, I'm certain that they'll be welcomed back into the fold, and applauded by their friends and teammates in the league for the efforts they have made, and the distance they have come.

In the meantime, though, there are no free rides.

Anonymous said...

Were the members told before hand when the test would take place and were they told the consequences to not passing the test prior? That seems the only way it would be fair.

If you joined the league and these stipulations were laid in front of you and you didn't meet the requirements, then all is fair.

If however, these policies were put into place without the entire leagues knowledge and if this was not made clear to members upon joining the league then I would say the fault lies with the leaders, and they are demonstrating poor leadership at that for failing to properly communicate what was expected of every member

Anonymous said...

All skaters were aware of the testing date and the criteria months in advance!

Anonymous said...

Wow. That's really odd as I've talked to a few of your skaters that passed and some that didn't. They didn't know the consequence of failing was being barred from the league and having their money refunded by mail.
Stinks like dirty politics to me.

Anonymous said...

I think that you term "barred from the league" is not only harsh, but incorrect. If they were in fact, "barred", they would not asked to retest or to take on a non skating roll.

Maybe you should check your sources better OR if you're a cut skater, you should work your ass off and come back at the re-tryouts. Complaining and stirring the pot really get you nowhere, rather, it takes you 2 steps back. And if you had any interest in the betterment of the league you would not continue to press a DEAD issue.

Anonymous said...

As a skater I firmly believe that you should "work your ass off ". I also have seen the difference that skating with other skaters makes. Not being allowed to practice with the league isn't just silly IMO, it's an obvious shove out the door. We don't need you and don't care enough to help you stay.

And maybe somebody should stop HB cranky ass from running her mouth at a speed even her skates can't keep up with.

Anonymous said...

I think every league has issues like this (we certainly do) where policies are supported by some girls and not by others and because it is roller derby (roller derby = life) it can get very contentious very quickly.

That sums it up nicely. How about we all move on now?

Hannah Barbaric said...

Please forgive me if I'm just being paranoid, but someone pointed out the "HB" comment to me and now I'm concerned that people think (or will think) it has something to do with me.

I've fought all these battles in my former derby life and I’m done fighting. I came to Cincinnati to skate with a competitive league and be away from all that, and that is precisely what I’m doing. I was required to pass the tests like everybody else.

For the record, I haven't posted a comment about this issue here or in any other forum anywhere, anonymously or otherwise; and I don't intend to post anything else regarding this issue in the future.

I could not be happier with my team, my teammates, my coaches and everything about the Cincinnati Rollergirls. I'm proud to be a Cincinnati Rollergirl. I can't wait until we get a chance to play Boston and show them what CRG is really all about.

And, that's all I've got to say about that.

Hannah Barbaric
Cincinnati Rollergirls #85

Anonymous said...

This statement just dumbfounds me: "they are demonstrating poor leadership at that for failing to properly communicate what was expected of every member". Every skater should know that leadership expects them to have the MINIMUM skating skills and knowledge of the rules of the dangerous contact sport that we play (honestly, is it really that much to ask??). As individuals, we should expect MUCH, MUCH more of ourselves. Instead, some choose to play the blame game.